Peer Value: Advancing the Commons Collaborative Economy

Amsterdam. September 2-3, 2016

About


Peer Value:Advancing the Commons Collaborative Economy is a conference integrating conversations and plans of action for shaping and connecting the Commons on a global level.
The conference is organized along three tracks:
  • Track 1: P2P: Inclusive Politics, Activism and Law for the Commons
  • Track 2: Decentralized Tech and Beyond:Global Design,Local Production
  • Track 3: From Platform to Open Cooperativism
We will explore questions such as:
  • What are the conditions that encourage communities to work as peers, creating commons?
  • What are the best practices communities can adopt to safeguard their resilience?
  • Decentralization - why is it important, and how is it implemented and maintained?
  • How can the working methodologies honed by well-established digital communities act as transitional guidelines for sustainable “material” manufacturing?
  • What about social innovation and livelihoods - how does contributory and open accounting work with the systems of value creation found in CBPP?
  • How can civil society participate in recommending policy proposals that support CBPP for governments at the local, regional, national - even global - levels?
Join your peers, add your voice and take part in the growing conversation about the Commons as an important, emerging collaborative social model.

Schedule


2/9/2016
8:30
Registration and Welcome coffee
Venue:

9:00
Opening and Intro Day 1
Frank Kresin
Venue: Raadzaal

Chairman of the day, Frank Kresin, frames the program during his welcome word.

9:30
Pro-commons policy & collaborative economy
Plenary - Moderator: Mayo Fuster. Speakers: Steve Hill, Vasilis Niaros.
Venue: Raadzaal

Collaborative economy: From corporate rhetorics to commons practices.

Steve Hill will provide an introduction to the collaborative economy particularly to the rhetorics and practices of the corporate model with a focus on its expansion in USA.
Mayo Fuster (Dimmons.net) will introduce the frame of commons collaborative economy.

City level: What are cities doing? Which best strategies to promote commons models of collaborative economy?

Mayo Fuster will introduce Barcelona City Council policy program in order to promote a commons collaborative economy and procomuns.net policy recommendations; Vasilis Niaros will introduce the policy recommendations and situation regarding the Greece and Ecuador cases (connected to the work we developed as part of the P2Pvalue); and, an intervention from Amsterdam experience. We will discuss and define possible city collaborations and a Commons actions plan.

9:30
Blockchain for the commons and Foundups
Amanda Jansen
Venue: Boekmanzaal

Foundups is launching unDevcon2 on September 18 in the aim to switch the economical system of failure and competition to one of infinite growth and abundance. Where startups will no longer fail for 99,7%, but innovation will be accelerated.

With an unconference about blockchain, the war on currencies and the ability to make blockchain of use for the 99%, Foundups launches the discussion how to use blockchain technology properly and serve the planet. The new technology will affect about every field in life possible. At the current moment neo-liberal forces are capturing the most accepted currency. Ethereum Classic might be the best thing ever happened to shift the field and create awareness.

10:30
Break
Venue:

11:00
A Lab for the Urban Commons and the City as a Commons: LabGov AMS and the CO-Ams process
Debate - Moderator: Sophie Bloemen. Speakers: John Grin (UvA), Stan Majoor (HvA), Faiza Dadi (Gemeente Amsterdam), Christian Iaione (LabGov Bologna), Thomas de Groot (Deelraad Amsterdam West, Piraten Partij), Joachim Meerkerk (Pakhuis de Zwijger).
Venue: Raadzaal

The merits of community and of local stewardship are increasingly recognized. In many cities there is a blossoming of social innovation practices: citizens are taking responsibility for their direct environment, often through the creation of social & cultural initiatives that build and strengthen the community; from urban farming to renewable energy coops. These can be considered urban commons. We will discuss what we mean with the city as a commons, how we can get there, what is happening in Amsterdam and how a laboratory for the governance of the commons could play a key role, sharing the experiences of the Bologna Labgov.

11:00
Online Participatory Cultures
Plenary (90min), Q&A (20min) - Moderator: Frank Kresin. Speakers: Lisha Sterling, Craig Ambrose, Rachel O’Dwyer, Samer Hassan, Pablo Oranjuren.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

Beyond providing a platform for publishing, the Internet has provided us with a theoretically border-free environment for community gathering and shared workspaces. Networked applications allow us to build virtual companies where coworkers may be sitting in cubicles next to each other, sitting thousands of miles apart in different offices or may have no physical office space at all. Group decisions can be made through online governance tools which permit equal or weighted voting. The provenance of work can be tracked through cryptographically unique identification markers, which allow all collaborators to receive attribution and compensation for the final product, even if they never interact directly with one another. These tools can be used for business, community organizing and for political action from the neighborhood to the global level.

13:00
Lunch
Venue:

14:00
Is the EU only a problem or can it also be part of the solution?
Debate - Moderator: David Hammerstein. Speakers: Sophie Bloemen, Michel Bauwens, Carmen Lozano, Mayo Fuster, Melanie Dulong, Jaromil.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

EU as facilitator or barrier to the commons?

The EU is in a deep existential crisis. The EU´s dominant narratives are increasingly unappealing and unsubstantiated. Can we envision the EU and its policies from a commons perspective? This session also includes an introduction and call for a European Commons Assembly.

14:00
From Platform to Open Cooperativism.
Plenary - Moderator: Josef Davies Coates. Speakers: Jessica Gordon Nembhard , John Restakis, Alex Pazaitis, Douglas Rushkoff (VOIP), Trebor Scholz (VOIP), Ben Cerveny
Venue: Raadzaal

Platform Cooperativism raises essential questions of governance and workplace democracy within the digital platforms that increasingly mediate our daily lives. But what are we actually producing with our newly democratised labor power? How do open data, ecological stewardship and the active production of Commons expand on and reinvigorate well established cooperative traditions?

14:00
Design Global, Manufacture Local.
Plenary - Moderator: Michiel Schwarz. Speakers: Vasilis Niaros, Tiberius Brastaviceanu, Lisha Sterling.
Venue: Vergaderzaal 1

The “design global, manufacture local” (DGML) model builds on the conjunction of the digital commons (e.g. open knowledge and design) with desktop manufacturing and automation technologies (e.g. 3D printing and CNC machines). It describes the processes where design is developed, shared and improved as a global digital commons, whereas the actual customised manufacturing takes place locally. DGML could be a model of sustainable development which recognises the limits and scarcities posed by finite resources and effectively organises material activities accordingly.

14:00
We Society: Municipality of Rotterdam in collaboration with Movement of Movements / United Earth.
Plenary. - Speakers: Vera Bauman, Robert Schram.
Venue: Vergaderzaal 2

15:30
Break
Venue:

16:00
Policies and Law for the Commons.
Presentation and panel - Moderator: Lisha Sterling. Speakers: Janelle Orsi (via VOIP), David Bollier.
Venue: Raadzaal

Historically, commons have had a problematic relationship with conventional law, which generally reflects the mindset and priorities of the sovereign (monarch, nation-state, corporation) and not the lived experiences and practices of commoners. Still, in grappling with political, economic and legal realities, commoners often find ways to secure control over their common wealth, livelihoods and modes of commoning. It is also what is spurring many commoners today to invent creative new types of law – formal, social, technological – to protect their shared interests, assets and social relationships.

16:00
Licensing for the Commons.
Plenary - Moderator: Vasilis Niaros. Speakers: Bruno Carballa, Baruch Gottlieb, Michel Bauwens.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

With its focus on open access and equitable distribution of ownership, traditional Intellectual Property regimes are unsuited for commoning. The more prominent hacks to existing IP frameworks — such a Copyleft and Creative Commons Non Commercial licenses — have proven to be successful alternatives. But what are the advantages and drawbacks of these new licenses and can we imbue a sense of reciprocity while licensing for the Commons?

16:00
A Lab for the Urban Commons and the City as a Commons: LabGov AMS and the CO-Ams process.
Workshop - Joachim Meerkerk
Venue: Theaterzaal

Workshop: City as a commons.

Concept: 1. How can we get there. 2. What is happening in Amsterdam? 3. What could LabGov do in Amsterdam?

16:00
Workshop Pro commons policy & collaborative economy.
Workshop - Moderator: Mayo Fuster.
Venue: Vergaderzaal 2

17:10
Wrap up of Day 1
Frank Kresin
Venue: Raadzaal

Chairman of the day, Frank Kresin, wraps up day 1 during his closing words.

17:30
Closing drinks.
Venue:

Speakers Dinner (Location TBD)
Venue:

3/9/2016
9:00
Registration and Welcome coffee
Venue:

Description of this event

9:30
Welcome and Intro day 2
Frank Kresin
Venue: Raadzaal

Chairman of the day, Frank Kresin, welcomes visitors back to the event and frames day 2 in his welcome word.

9:30
Sustainable Livelihoods and Alternative Financing
Plenary - Moderator: Stacco Troncoso. Speakers: Sarah de Heusch, Carmen Lozano Bright, Lisha Sterling.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

As a twist on the original phrase, consider this: “Some people can volunteer all of the time, all of the people can volunteer some of the time, but all of the people can’t volunteer all of the time”.

Increasingly precarious situations for workers worldwide are causing many people to turn to commoning to overcome their alienation in the labor market and, when possible, to meet their materials needs. But as a practice, commoning cannot yet provide sustainable livelihoods for all potential commoners; hybrid solutions must be sought. This plenary explores the concept of work solidarity to ensure the creation and resilience of commons-oriented projects, and social protection for today’s disenfranchised laborers.

10:00
(Em)powering People: Renewable Energy as a Commons
Plenary. - Moderator: David Hammerstein. Speakers: Cecile Blanchet, David Bollier, Abdelhulheb Choco (tbc), Zuiderlicht (tbc).
Venue: Raadzaal

How can we promote community-based renewable energy in the EU?  What is the role of energy cooperatives in the energy transition and for developing the Commons?

During the plenary session, we will first present the background of the energy transition and the role of community energy in that transition. In particular, we will focus on policy as part of the enabling environment, using examples from Germany and other countries, including the Netherlands. We will also place these considerations in a broader view, especially within that of the EU policies (Energy Union). A large place will be left for discussion, in order to investigate the tools that could help to promote energy cooperatives at local and global scales (from policy making to digital tools). Finally, other points of discussion will involve the role of community energy in building the Commons (and vice-versa), the potential for transferring knowledge and technology, etc.

During the workshop session, we want to share practical and grassroots experiences from energy cooperatives, and have an open discussion focusing on the limits and barriers for communities to build their own power plant (e.g., financing), how to overcome these in order to scale-up.

11:00
Break
Venue:

11:30
Workshop (Em)powering People: Renewable Energy as a Commons.
Workshop. - Host: David Hammerstein.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

How can we promote community-based renewable energy in the EU?  What is the role of energy cooperatives in the energy transition and for developing the Commons?

During the workshop session, we want to share practical and grassroots experiences from energy cooperatives, and have an open discussion focusing on the limits and barriers for communities to build their own power plant (e.g., financing), how to overcome these in order to scale-up.

11:30
Meta Economic Networks.
Plenary. - Moderator: Stacco Troncoso. Speakers: Dmytri Kleiner, George Dafermos, Genevieve Parkes, Stephanie Rearick.
Venue: Raadzaal

From community-oriented business to business-enhanced communities, Meta Economic networks are affinity-based networks combining new forms of labor with supportive and commons-generating solidarity structures. Hear the stories of people working together to “do Stuff that Matters” from Catalonia (Spain), Madison, Wisconsin (USA) and New Zealand as well as the innovative proposal for a Venture Commune.

13:00
Lunch
Venue:

14:00
From Platform to Open Cooperativism.
Plenary - Moderator: Josef Davies Coates. Speakers: Donnie Maclurcan, Josef Davies Coates, Nathan Schneider (VOIP), Pat Conaty.
Venue: Raadzaal

Platform Cooperativism raises essential questions of governance and workplace democracy within the digital platforms that increasingly mediate our daily lives. But what are we actually producing with our newly democratised labor power? How do open data, ecological stewardship and the active production of Commons expand on and reinvigorate well established cooperative traditions?

14:00
State Power and Commoning: Transcending a Problematic Relationship.
Plenary. - Moderator: Alex Pazaitis. Speakers: David Bollier, Michel Bauwens, Jessica Gordon Nembhard, John Restakis, George Dafermos, Mayo Fuster.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

Can the Commons and the State fruitfully co-exist – and if so, how? Can commoners re-imagine “the State” from a Commons perspective so that its powers could be used to affirmatively support commoning and a post-capitalist, post-growth means of provisioning and governance?

14:00
State Power and Commoning: Transcending a Problematic Relationship.
Q&A Lounge
Venue: Theaterzaal

15:30
Break
Venue:

16:00
Introducing the European Commons Assembly.
Plenary. - Moderator: Lisha Sterling. Speakers: Martin Kirk, Bayo Akomolafe, Hilary Wainwright.
Venue: Raadzaal

While many platforms can be described as P2P, our understanding of the term is more generally human-scale rather than exclusively tech-focused. Exploring peer to peer as “person to person” or “people to people” highlights its relevance as a relational dynamic. P2P Cultures describes the process of people self-organizing in non-hierarchical ways to create common value in diverse socio-economic and cultural settings worldwide.

16:00
Workshop with Mayo and Adam Ardvisson presentation/discussion of P2P Value
Mayo Fuster, Adam Ardvisson
Venue: Vergaderzaal 1

16:00
Ditigal Democracy for the Commons by Oview App.
Plenary. - Moderator: Amanda Jansen. Speakers: Coby Babani.
Venue: Boekmanzaal

International collaboration around public awareness, sharing public opinions and sharing measurements. Digital democracy has been a journey. Issues around privacy arise every time someone wants to introduce it. Oview app offers citizens the possibility to share opinions and institutions a way to measure and become aware. A new playing field for the commons on democracy arises.

17:10
Closing remarks.
Plenary. - Speaker: Michel Bauwens.
Venue: Raadzaal

Michel Bauwens, president and founder of the P2P Foundation will synthesize the dialogues, ideas and possible outcomes of the conference during this special closing keynote.

17:50
Wrap up
Frank Kresin
Venue: Raadzaal

Chairman of the day, Frank Kresin, wraps up day 2 during his closing words.

18:00
Closing drinks
Venue:

Participants


  • Douglas Rushkoff

    David Bollier

    John Restakis

  • Denis Roio / Jaromil

    Hilary Waingwright

    Bayo Akomolafe

  • Pat Conaty

    David Hammerstein

    Sophie Bloemen

  • Stephanie Rearick

    Ben Cerveny

    Donnie Maclurcan

  • Jessica Gordon

    Cecile Blanchet

    Alex Pazaitis

  • Bill Niaros

    Baruch Gottlieb

    Dmytri Kleiner

  • Josef Davies-Coates

    Martin Kirk

    Dominik Wind

  • Lisha Sterling

    Tiberius Brastaviceanu

    Carmen Lozano Bright

  • Samer Hassan

    Pablo Ojanguren Menendez

    Craig Ambrose

  • Rachel O’Dwyer

    Sarah de Heusch

Douglas Rushkoff
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David Bollier
David is an author, activist, blogger and consultant who spends a lot of time exploring the commons as a new paradigm of economics, politics and culture. He has been on this trail for about fifteen years, working with a variety of international and domestic partners. In 2010, he co-founded the Commons Strategies Group, a consulting project that works to promote the commons internationally. Website: http://bollier.org/
John Restakis
John Restakis is Executive Director of Community Evolution Foundation and former ED of the BC Co-operative Association in Vancouver, a position he held for sixteen years.  His professional background includes community organizing, adult and popular education, and co-op development. He is Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Sustainable Community Development, Simon Fraser University, BC and is Research Associate for Co-operatives UK. He does consulting work on international co-op and community economic development projects, researches and teaches on co-operative economies and the social economy, and lectures widely on the subject of globalization, regional development, and alternative economics. He is the author of Humanizing the Economy – Co-operatives in the Age of Capital.
Denis Roio / Jaromil
Jaromil is CTO and co~founder of the Dyne.org think &do tank (est. 1999) home to a digital community of critical makers and nomadic developers. He writes code and publishes it as free and open source software, his research focuses on the subjects of decentralization, algorithms and independent media practices. Jaromil was awarded the Vilém Flusser Award (Transmediale) and recognized as top 100 social enterpreneur (Purpose Economy, 2014) and European young leader (40 under 40, 2012).
Hilary Waingwright
Writer, researcher and editor , Fellow of the Transnational INstitute, Amsterdam, working on its New Politics Programme , and founder editor of Red Pepperb , the independent minded radical , feminist , green and socialist magazine published in the UK
Bayo Akomolafe
Author, speaker, and ‘walkout’ academic, Bayo is globally recognized for his poetic, unconventional, counterintuitive take on global crisis, civic action and social change. He is the Initiating/Coordinating Curator for ‘the emergence network’ (A Post-Activist Project) [www.emergencenetwork.org], and host of the online course, ‘We will dance with Mountains’. A young professor/lecturer of clinical psychology and ethnopsychotherapeutic researcher, Bayo hopes to inspire a diffractive network of sharing – a slowing down, an ethics of entanglement, an activism of inquiry, a ‘politics of surprise’…one that does not treat the crises of our times as exterior to ‘us’ or the ‘solutions’ that conventional activism offers as separate from the problems that we seek to nullify. Bayo is also Special Envoy for the International Alliance for Localization. Bayo believes that ‘the ordinary is what the extraordinary wants to become’, and is crafting a ‘decolonized’ life with his ‘life-force’, Ej (also a young ‘walkout’ academic), and their unschooled daughter, Alethea-Aanya.
Pat Conaty
Pat Conaty is a Californian working in England and Wales. He is a Fellow of the New Economics Foundation (NEF) and he is also a research associate of Co-operatives UK. He specialises in action research, education and development that focuses on successful methods of social innovation. During the 1990s he led work at NEF to introduce to the UK Community Development Finance and other forms of co-operative and mutual banking. More recently he has been working on developing other innovative forms of co-operative economic democracy including community land trusts for housing and and social co-operatives for care services. Many of these solutions are covered in his 2012 book with Mike Lewis The Resilience Imperative: Co-operative Transitions to a Steady-state Economy. His latest book on developing the urban commons and co-edited with Martin Large is Commons Sense: Co-operative place making and the capturing of land value for 21st century Garden Cities (2014).
David Hammerstein
David Hammerstein is a policy advocate in Brussels and Spain, co-founder of commonsnetwork.eu that is networking for the sharing economy and the defense of the natural and social commons, as well as  working as a public interest consultant on access to health and access to knowledge issues in the EU. He is a former Member of the European Parliament 2004-9.
Sophie Bloemen
Sophie Bloemen is based in Berlin and writes, speaks, and organises on the sharing of knowledge, the commons and new narratives for Europe. She co-founded and runs Commons Network a civil society initiative based in Berlin and Brussels, focusing on bringing the commons perspective to policy. She has worked as an advocate and public interest consultant for various NGOs on health, trade & innovation, as well as on cross-border cultural dialogue for Europe. She is engaged in a number of projects and political processes that explore and discuss new, creative institutions and collaborative models, particularly on health R&D, internet infrastructure and urban commons. Sophie has degrees in philosophy, political economy and International Relations, from the university of Amsterdam and London School of Economics. @sbloemen
Stephanie Rearick
Based in Madison, Wisconsin, Stephanie Rearick is founder and former Co-Director of the Dane County TimeBank, a 2800-member time exchange, and Creative Director of Mutual Aid Networks, a new type of networked cooperative ‘creating means for everyone to discover and succeed in work they want to do, with the support of their community.’ In addition to her work in growing ground-up economic and community regeneration, Rearick is co-owner of Mother Fool's Coffeehouse. Rearick worked for Greenpeace for six years of young adulthood, helped launch Madison Hours local currency in 1995 and served for several years on the steering committee of independent local political party Progressive Dane. Rearick also works as a musician.
Ben Cerveny
Ben Cerveny is a Design Fellow at Samsung and President of software studio TEEM, providing open-source solutions for data visualization and collaboratively mediated public environments to partners as diverse as ARUP, Slack, and Valve. He was previously President of data-play product company Bloom, strategist at visualization studio Stamen Design, a designer of the massively multiplayer game that became Flickr, and the founder of the Experience Design Lab at frogdesign. He was also founder of a ‘computation and urbanism’ research foundation based in Amsterdam called VURB.
Donnie Maclurcan
A facilitator, author and social entrepreneur, Donnie Maclurcan is passionate about all things not-for-profit. Originally from Australia, he is presently an Affiliate Professor of Social Science at Southern Oregon University, in the U.S., from where he runs the Post Growth Institute: an international group exploring how we can flourish beyond capitalism. As a consultant he has helped more than 300 not-for-profit projects start, scale and sustain their work, while his own initiatives include co-founding: Free Money Day, the Post Growth Alliance, the (En)Rich List, Cascades Hub, and Project Australia. He holds a PhD in social science that explored how nanotechnology might affect global inequality, and is currently completing his third book, titled: How on Earth: Flourishing in a Not-For-Profit World.
Jessica Gordon
Jessica Gordon Nembhard is Professor of Community Justice and Social Economic Development in the Department of Africana Studies at John Jay College, of the City University of New York (CUNY) in New York City, USA, where she is also Director of the McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program. She is an affiliate scholar at the Centre for the Study of Co-operatives at the University of Saskatchewan, and a member of the Canadian “Measuring the Difference of Cooperatives Research Network”; and an affiliate scholar with the Economics Department’s Center on Race and Wealth at Howard University.
Cecile Blanchet
Cecile studied geology and paleoclimates at various universities in France and holds a PhD from the Aix-Marseille University, obtained in 2006. Her main research focus lies on studying past climates and environments, in order to better understand the processes and feedback loops driving climatic changes. After several years as a post-doctoral fellow, she took a career turn in 2014 towards renewable energies. She studied project management in wind energy at Proventus Energie Academy in Berlin and was then appointed at GCF in October 2015, where she administrates the “Green-win” H2020 research project. Through political activism, Cecile has also developped a great interest for community-owned infrastructure, in particular decentralised green-energy production.
Alex Pazaitis
Alexandros (Alex) Pazaitis is Research Fellow at P2P Lab, an interdisciplinary research hub, community-driven makerspace and spin-off of the P2P Foundation and Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance (Tallinn University of Technology). Alex is participating in numerous research activities, including scholarly papers and research and innovation projects. He has professional experience in project management and has worked as a consultant for private and public organizations in planning and implementation of various EU-funded cooperation projects. His research interests include technology governance; innovation policy and sustainability; desktop manufacturing; commons and blockchain-mediated collaboration.
Bill Niaros
Vasilis (Bill) Niaros is the Sustainability Steward of the P2P Foundation and a Research Fellow at the P2P Lab. His research work is related to commons-oriented urban and regional development with an emphasis on the use of ICT and desktop manufacturing technologies.
Baruch Gottlieb
Baruch Gottlieb trained as a filmmaker at Concordia University, has been working in digital art with specialization in public art since 1999. He is an active member of telekommunisten, arts & economics group and laboratoire deberlinisation. He is the author of Gratitude for technolgy (2009, Atropos) and A Political Economy of the Smallest Things (2016, Atropos), and blogs on labour concerns in techno-industry. He currently lectures at the University of Arts Berlin and is curator of the travelling exhibition Vilém Flusser & the Arts.
Dmytri Kleiner
Dmytri Kleiner is the dilettantish and polemic author of The Telekommunist Manifesto, and a contributing artist to the Telekommunisten Network's Miscommunication Technologies continuing series of artworks. In The Telekommunist Manifesto, Kleiner has published the Peer-Production licence, a commons-friendly Copyleft/Non-Commercial license the author has described as CopyFarLeft, and proposed Venture Communism, a mode of worker-controlled production modelled on peer networks and the commons. He can be followed at http://dmytri.info.
Josef Davies-Coates
Josef Davies-Coates is the Founder of United Diversity, an Associate of the P2P Foundation and Co-founder of The Open Co-op who are organsing a big 2 day conference on Platform Co-ops in London http://conference.open.coop.
Martin Kirk
Martin Kirk is Head of Strategy for The Rules. In this role, he will be responsible for the campaign framing, strategies and delivery globally, and supporting partners and allies to deliver campaigns nationally and regionally. Before joining The Rules, Martin was Head of UK Campaigns at Oxfam GB. As well as leading the campaigning teams in England, Scotland and Wales, he co- authored Finding Frames: New Ways to Engage the UK Public in Global Poverty and various related pieces that have helped challenge and evolve public campaigning models. Prior to Oxfam, Martin was Head of Global Advocacy at Save the Children UK, where he was responsible for high-level advocacy with donor and recipient governments and multi-lateral institutions. He has written for numerous publications including The Independent, The Guardian, Al-Jazeera, Foreign Policy in Focus and the journal of Ethics and International Affairs. He holds a BA (Honors) in Modern History from Kingston University.
Dominik Wind
Dominik is a strategic designer passionate about open source technology and critical design. As a consultant he supports his clients to navigate complexity by creating extraordinary experiences and meaningful artifacts. He is the co-founder of Open State, a Berlin based laboratory dedicated to the development of fully operating, sustainable, and replicable cells of a future-proof society. In 2014 he co-founded POC21, an international innovation community that was launched with a 7 week long innovation camp in the run-up to the COP21 U.N. climate negotiations in Paris. In fall 2015 +300 makers, designers, engineers and geeks joined forces to prototype a fossil free future: 12 open source projects around the topic of electricity generation, water filteration, and food production were developed and the message of a citizen driven approach to mitigate climate catastrophe was delivered to a multi million audience. Building on top of this experience Dominik is currently setting up the GoodTech Lab, a collaborative studio for sustainable technologies and an impact investors syndicate to support theses ventures. Dominik holds a diploma in media pedagogy and is a lecturer at the HPI and University of Potsdam.
Lisha Sterling
Lisha Sterling works at Geeks Without Bounds helping to organize collaborative hackathons, providing mentorship to teams that build humanitarian open source technology projects, and carrying the responsibilities that go with the title executive director. She has more than 2 decades experience in building and breaking into computers and their software. She sees the freedom of open source [software|hardware|art|government] as vital to a healthy society and a healthy economy and the privacy of personal data as equally vital for health and safety.
Tiberius Brastaviceanu
I am one of the main architects of the open value network model, and very instrumental in its implementation. I work very closely with the developers of our IT infrastructure, and I am very active in shaping our governance. I also do a lot of network weaving, coordination, facilitation, guidance, documentation and network animation.
On the business side, I am developing sustainable, self-organizing ecosystems based on open innovation. The business models that interest me the most are based on p2p economics principles and rely on p2p technologies.
My academic background is in physics, non-linear optics and laser applications to biotechnology, as well as epistemology. Within SENSORICA, I am also active in optical sensing projects and I sometimes contribute to software development.
Carmen Lozano Bright
Born in Colombia of Spanish and British background, since 2012 she has lived in Madrid where she experiences and researches the rising transformation of citizen laboratories and P2P practices. In 2015, she joined the Goteo/Platoniq team, a platform that incentives the growth of the commons through crowdfunding. Also during 2015, she developed a project on peer-to-peer initiatives that are transforming public space through Southern Europe: 'P2P Plazas: a Southern European Network'. @carmenlozano
Samer Hassan
Samer Hassan (PhD) is an activist and researcher, Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (Harvard University) and Assistant Professor at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). He has carried out research in decentralized systems, social simulation and artificial intelligence from positions in the University of Surrey (UK) and the American University of Science & Technology (Lebanon). Coming from a multidisciplinary background in Computer Science and Social Sciences, he has more than 45 publications in those fields (H-index=11). Engaged in free/open source projects, he co-founded the Comunes Nonprofit and the Move Commons webtool project, and has experience in multiple communities and grassroots initiatives. He's involved as UCM Principal Investigator in the EU-funded P2Pvalue project on building decentralized webtools for Commons-based peer production. His research interests include Commons-based peer production, online communities, distributed architectures, social movements & cyberethics. Follow Samer on Twitter: @sh3v3k
Pablo Ojanguren Menendez
Software Engineer and Researcher in decentralized technologies for collaboration.
Craig Ambrose
Craig is an experienced software developer leaving in a permaculture designed ecovillage. He’s involved as a director of the trust creating atamaivillage.nz, and is interested both in old fashioned hand crafts and sending people to mars. Craig hopes to use lean startup techniques to build transformative alternatives to the power structures that hold humans back from a more equitable and exciting future.
Rachel O’Dwyer
Rachel O’Dwyer is a lecturer and researcher in the School of Computer Science in Trinity College Dublin. She is the leader of the Dublin Art and Technology Association (www.data.ie) and curator of Openhere (www.openhere.data.ie), a festival and conference on the digital commons. Rachel is a core member of the P2P Foundation where she helps to coordinates the P2P academic research network and 100 women in peer-to-peer. She publishes, speaks, and organizes events on topics such as the political economy of communications, disruptive technologies and the digital commons. She is a regular contributor to Neural magazine.
Sarah de Heusch
Sarah de Heusch is a Project officer for the Development & Strategy Unit of SMart. Currently addressing the issue of social protection and labor market evolutions, she builds partnerships and collaborates with organizations and academics that share SMarts’ values and concerns. Previously she was involved in the internationalization of SMart and addressed issues of professional mobility of artists. Before, Sarah was Co-founder and Dancer of Transe-en-Dance and the Assistant to the Secretary General at UNICA (University Network of Capitals of Europe). She holds a Masters in Political Sociology from the Université Libre de Bruxelles.

Contact


Location

City town hall Amstel 1, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Phone

+00 123 4567